Mediation

If you manage staff, you’ll have experienced some conflict at some point.  We have trained mediators who can work with your most challenging working relationships.    In many scenarios, we may be able to resolve the issue early by facilitating a meeting between the staff which may only take an hour, however for more deep rooted conflict formal mediation, has a very high success rate, and is certainly significantly cheaper than a tribunal case for all parties.

Sometimes, it’s quite tricky for an employer to decide who’s right and who’s wrong, more often it’s impossible to conclude a ‘falling out’ that way.  A break down in working relationships may be due to a personality clash, cultural differences or poor communications,  whatever the reason, it’s absolutely crucial that we ‘nip it in the bud’.

Our mediators and facilitators have years of experience in resolving conflict.  There are a few ground rules we set when starting a mediation process:

  • It is always voluntary either person can stop the meeting at any point
  • Each person get’s their opportunity to make their feelings heard (in a controlled environment)
  • The outcome is decided between the parties, through skilled questioning techniques applied by the mediator.

To put it simply, in Employment Mediation is a useful method of either rebuilding working relationships or finding an alternative route forward.  Give us a call for a no obligation free consultation, and we’ll be very honest about whether this is the correct route for your business/staff.

 

 

 

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To start with I was extremely nervous about sitting face to face with the person who I’d not long had a ‘blow up’ with, but following a reassuring call from Georgina, who informed me the process was voluntary, and could be adjourned at any point, I decided to go ahead.  I felt it was a very fair and pragmatic way of rebuilding my relationship with my line manager, which had deteriorated over a number of year’

An employee, who chose to remain anonymous